Fall 2018 – Philly Tributaries

Written by Jon West

TS74 – This site was monitored in October of the fall quarter. An increase in riparian vegetation, including an abundance of invasive porcelain berry was observed at the site.

 

TS75 – This site was monitored all three months of the fall quarter. Water clarity was generally clear, with bubbles coating the surface. Algae cover was rare-moderate with small, temporary leaf packs accumulating in the stream. Heavy rains over the course of the late summer and fall months continued gradual erosion, and washed away some sediment islands in the middle of the stream. In October, a small mass of dead crayfish were observed in the creek, presumably washed down from another location upstream.

 

TS80 – This stream was monitored in September and October of the fall quarter. An area of the stream had a strong sewage odor in October, and this was attributed to recent heavy rains. In September, the headwaters of the stream appeared to have a bluish coloration, but neither a chemical odor nor unusual sheen was observed with this phenomenon. Expected seasonal changes occurred, and continued bank erosion was observed in areas.

 

TS85 – This site was monitored in October of the fall quarter. The canopy still maintained 50-80% coverage and algae was rare. Run (75%), pool (15%), and riffle (10%) stream characteristics were observed at the monitoring site. Slower flows, fallen trees (although not blocking flow), and pebble deposits at the confluence with the Wissahickon were observed on the walking section.

 

TS90 – This site was monitored all three months of the fall quarter. An annual habitat assessment was conducted in September. Seasonal changes in foliage occurred, with an increase in leaf packs varying in size and duration, with some areas packed thick in crevices due to the force of flood waters. New, increased bank erosion and sedimentation was observed in the usual places, with increased movement of gravel, pebbles and boulders downstream and deposited along the banks in areas. Lots of blowdown was observed, and the Friends of the Wissahickon performed some much-needed clearing in areas where the creek was blocked. Increased groundwater exposure and erosion was observed along steep slopes descending from Livezy Lane. During the walking section, a new, large logjam with rocks, tree limbs, and other debris was observed at Devil’s Pool. A raccoon was also observed traversing through the area. Evidence of major flooding (up to 6 feet high in places) was observed around the confluence with the Wissahickon during November monitoring.

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